Intervention

The intervention

What will happen during the intervention?

In the operating room, you will be put to sleep and then the surgeon will carry out radiological imaging to precisely locate the area(s) to set in place.

In general, the operation will last between two and six hours, depending on the technique used and the number of vertebrae to fuse. The neurosurgeon may need to insert one or two small hoses (drains or Redons) to allow the flow of blood to the incision areas. These hoses do not cause any pain and will be removed after a maximum of 48 hours.

The intervention

What will happen during the intervention?

In the operating room, you will be positioned to lie on your stomach. The physician will carry out a radiological exam to precisely locate the area of the herniated disc. After making a cutaneous incision a few centimeters long, the neurosurgeon will remove the hernia and possibly part of the disc.

It may be necessary to insert a small hose (drain or Redon) in the area of the incision to allow the flow of blood. This hose causes no pain and will usually be removed after 48 hours.

Preparation for the intervention

How should you prepare for your admission?

The Neurosurgery Division will send you a document to inform you about admission procedures for the division. You will also be scheduled for a pre-hospitalization consultation where you will see an anesthetist, a Resident in the Neurosurgery Division and a specialized nurse.

Heart attacks: acting without delay

Time also plays a vital role in the management of myocardial infarction, commonly known as a heart attack. The faster treatment is given, the better the prognosis. To accelerate medical procedures and save lives, the HUG has set up a pre-hospital alarm system or STEMI (STElevation Myocardial Infarction) alarm in 2006, which speeds up the patient's care and allows direct access to the cath lab, without going through the ER.

What are spinal block and epidural anesthesia?

These are two techniques used to eliminate pain during a surgical or obstetrical procedure. They numb the part of the body that is being operated on:

A spinal block consists of injecting a medication (local anesthetic) into the cerebrospinal fluid (spine) where the nerve roots are located. This involves the use of a needle that is then removed. In rare cases, a catheter (very small soft tube) is placed through the needle to allow additional doses of medication to be injected.

What is peripheral nerve catheter anesthesia?

Peripheral nerve catheter anesthesia consists of the continuous infusion of anesthetics through a catheter (very small soft plastic tube) near the nerves involved in the area to be operated on. This type of anesthesia numbs the part of the body around the catheter so that a surgical procedure can be performed without pain. This technique also serves as an analgesic (painkiller) in the operated area and lasts during the post-operation period: the infusion of anesthetics through the peripheral nerve catheter is continued in the recovery room, your hospital room and sometimes even at home.

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