Relief

Easing the pain

Whether caused by an illness or operation, pain can cause significant suffering, both physical and psychological. Since 2003, the HUG has been pursuing an institutional program aimed at improving the assessment, treatment and monitoring of pain. Pain caused by treatment is a key focus.

Treating pain

Tailored to suit you

Most pain is relieved satisfactorily by combining: 

  • drugs
  • physiotherapy, massages, application of heat / cold
  • relaxation, hypnosis
  • psychotherapy
  • techniques to deaden or stimulate the nerve

Numerous drugs exist that are capable of efficiently relieving the pain (paracetamol, anti-inflammatory drugs, opiates, etc.). The treatment depends on the cause of the pain, how bad it is and what kind of pain it is, and should take into account any previous history.

Buttock pain (sciatica)

I have a pain in my buttock extending to the thigh, is this normal?

Pain that starts in the lower back and radiates to the buttock and down the leg is a sign of sciatica. It is due to compression of the sciatic nerve. In severe cases your physician may prescribe physiotherapy sessions.

Practical advice:

  • Rest, leaning back supported by cushions
  • Hot baths

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Vaginal itching

I have vaginal itching, what should I do?

Vaginal itching accompanied by yellowish, greenish, foul smelling discharge: please consult your attending physician. 
Taking an antibiotic treatment can encourage a fungal infection to develop.

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Burning urination

It burns when I urinate, what should I do?

Burning upon urination, lower abdominal pain and/or fever; Consult your physician, this can indicate urinary infection. It is rather common during pregnancy due to hormonal changes (progesterone causes stasis/urinary retention) and compression by the uterus.

Practical advice :
Drink plenty of water.

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Cramps

I am still bleeding after delivery and I have a stomach pain, is this normal?

Bleeding or "lochia" is normal after childbirth; it gradually becomes less bloody, becoming pink, then yellow and white and ceases between the 2nd and 6th postpartum week.

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Ligament twinges

I have twinges in the lower abdomen, what should I do?

In early pregnancy and until the middle of pregnancy, pain felt in the lower abdomen towards the folds of the groin often corresponds to "ligament twinges". The uterus is supported on both sides by ligaments that stretch during its growth, leading to pain that can be very uncomfortable. However, this is not abnormal.

During the second half of pregnancy these twinges can be contractions.

Practical advice:

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Lochia

I am still bleeding after delivery and I have a stomach pain, is this normal?

Bleeding or "lochia" is normal after childbirth; it gradually becomes less bloody, becoming pink, then yellow and white and ceases between the 2nd and 6th postpartum week.

English

Buttock pain (sciatica)

I have a pain in my buttock extending to the thigh, is this normal?

Pain that starts in the lower back and radiates to the buttock and down the leg is a sign of sciatica. It is due to compression of the sciatic nerve. In severe cases your physician may prescribe physiotherapy sessions.

Practical advice:

  • Rest, leaning back supported by cushions
  • Hot baths

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English

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