Perineum

The perineum

During pregnancy and delivery (vaginal and caesarean), your perineum is put under great strain. In the medium term, you may experience involuntary loss of urine, stools or wind when sneezing, coughing or exerting yourself. If the problem persists beyond six weeks after delivery, talk to your gynecologist or midwife. Specialized perineum consultations such as those in the maternity ward are available. Perineal re-education can be offered to you by a midwife or a specialized physiotherapist.

More information : 

Urinary incontinence

Urinary incontinence: dare to talk about it

The HUG Gynecology Division offers adapted and personalized diagnostic and therapeutic care for women with urinary incontinence.It is estimated that between 20 and 40% of women, depending on age, suffer from urinary incontinence. This condition affects about 500,000 women in Switzerland. However, because it is a source of embarrassment and feelings of shame, urinary incontinence is still taboo and most women do not dare to talk about it with their physician.

Perineum

How do I care for my perineum?

Whether your perineum is stitched or not, it requires hygiene care. It is important to:

  • Rinse (with mild soap or Kamillosan) every time you urinate
  • Dry thoroughly
  • Regularly change sanitary towels

The stitches heal and the threads are spontaneously resorbed within about ten days.

Perineum care:
Perineal rehabilitation (strength training for the perineum) is important, and can be started within the first two months after childbirth.

English

Perineum

How do I care for my perineum?

Whether your perineum is stitched or not, it requires hygiene care. It is important to:

  • Rinse (with mild soap or Kamillosan) every time you urinate
  • Dry thoroughly
  • Regularly change sanitary towels

The stitches heal and the threads are spontaneously resorbed within about ten days.

English