Practical Advice

Flu

I have the flu (common cold, sore throat, cough, etc.) without fever, what should I do?

The common cold is not dangerous for the baby. You can consult your family physician.

Practical advice:

  • Drink lots of fluids (water, herbal tea)
  • For example, for coughs: thyme tea with honey and lemon
  • For example, for colds: inhalation, seawater spray

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Tiredness

I am tired, what should I do?

Tiredness is relatively normal, it is due to the bodily changes and growth of your baby. This process requires a certain amount of energy.

Practical advice:

  • Don't feel guilty
  • Give yourself time to rest
  • Eat a balanced diet
  • Keep hydrated

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Toothache

I have a problem in my mouth (toothache, bleeding gums, etc.), what should I do?

The gums are highly vascularized during pregnancy. They can bleed or become inflamed more easily.

Quick tips:

  • Use a soft toothbrush
  • Have a check-up at your dentist

If you have toothache, visit your dentist for a check-up. Performing X-rays and/or undergoing local anesthesia, if necessary, is not contraindicated.

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Ligament twinges

I have twinges in the lower abdomen, what should I do?

In early pregnancy and until the middle of pregnancy, pain felt in the lower abdomen towards the folds of the groin often corresponds to "ligament twinges". The uterus is supported on both sides by ligaments that stretch during its growth, leading to pain that can be very uncomfortable. However, this is not abnormal.

During the second half of pregnancy these twinges can be contractions.

Practical advice:

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Back pain

I have back pain, what should I do?

The increased volume and weight of the uterus causes a curvature leading to dorsal and lumbar pain. If this becomes too significant, talk to your physician who will prescribe physiotherapy or osteopathy sessions.

Practical advice:

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Burning urination

It burns when I urinate, what should I do?

Burning upon urination, lower abdominal pain and/or fever; Consult your physician, this can indicate urinary infection. It is rather common during pregnancy due to hormonal changes (progesterone causes stasis/urinary retention) and compression by the uterus.

Practical advice :
Drink plenty of water.

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Baby blues

I feel sad, exhausted, unable to cope.

Is this the baby blues?

The baby blues occurs within 3 to 10 days after childbirth. The baby blues is not an illness but rather a reaction to a state of fatigue, drop in hormones and change in status: daughter, wife then mother.

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