After Childbirth

Bleeding after childbirth

I am still bleeding after delivery and I have a stomach pain; is this normal?

Vaginal discharge or "lochia" is normal after childbirth; it gradually becomes less bloody, becoming pink, then yellow and white and ceases between the 2nd and 6th postpartum week.

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Return to work

I have to return to work, what should I do about breastfeeding?

Returning to work depends on your contract and your employer. Depending on your wishes or your options, you can continue breastfeeding, for example the morning and evening milk can be stored. You can express your milk and keep it in the fridge to provide meals for your baby during the day. The alternative is weaning, either by spacing feedings to reduce milk secretion, or by using appropriate drugs. Prepare for your return to work by contacting a breastfeeding professional.

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Perineum

How do I care for my perineum?

Whether your perineum is stitched or not, it requires hygiene care. It is important to:

  • Rinse (with mild soap or Kamillosan) every time you urinate
  • Dry thoroughly
  • Regularly change sanitary towels

The stitches heal and the threads are spontaneously resorbed within about ten days.

Perineum care:
Perineal rehabilitation (strength training for the perineum) is important, and can be started within the first two months after childbirth.

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Hemorrhoids

I have hemorrhoids, what should I do?

Pregnancy can lead to hemorrhoids. They are due to the compression of the uterus on the large blood vessels, a hormone (progesterone) and constipation. Hemorrhoids can be painful and can result in bleeding, but they do not represent a risk to your baby.

Talk to your physician.

Practical advice:

  • Avoid constipation
  • Your physician may prescribe a hemorrhoid cream
  • Avoid prolonged standing

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Pre-eclampsia

My feet and hands are swollen, what should I do?

Edema of the hands and feet are common in the third trimester of pregnancy. They are more likely to occur with prolonged standing or heat. But beware, if they increase suddenly, if they are accompanied by headaches, "floaters" in front of the eyes, ringing in the ears, nausea, vomiting, irritability and/or pain in the upper part of the stomach, consult your physician quickly as this could indicate a pregnancy-related disease, pre-eclampsia.

Practical advice:

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Return to work

I have to return to work, what should I do about breastfeeding?

Returning to work depends on your contract and your employer. Depending on your wishes or your options, you can continue breastfeeding, for example the morning and evening milk can be stored. You can express your milk and keep it in the fridge to provide meals for your baby during the day. The alternative is weaning, either by spacing feedings to reduce milk secretion, or by using appropriate drugs. Prepare for your return to work by contacting a breastfeeding professional.

English

Perineum

How do I care for my perineum?

Whether your perineum is stitched or not, it requires hygiene care. It is important to:

  • Rinse (with mild soap or Kamillosan) every time you urinate
  • Dry thoroughly
  • Regularly change sanitary towels

The stitches heal and the threads are spontaneously resorbed within about ten days.

English

Hemorrhoids

I have hemorrhoids, what should I do?

Pregnancy can lead to hemorrhoids. They are due to the compression of the uterus on the large blood vessels, a hormone (progesterone) and constipation.  Hemorrhoids can be painful and can result in bleeding, but they do not represent a risk to your baby.

Talk to your physician.

Practical advice:

English