Research

The Angiology and Hemostasis Division has been involved in basic and clinical research for over 20 years with ongoing support from the Swiss National Science Foundation (principal investigators: Professors Henri Bounameaux, Philippe de Moerloose, Marc Righini and Pierre Fontana) and multiple national and international collaborations. A particular focus is placed on cross-disciplinary research, which is a direct bridge between exploratory research and clinical research. Ongoing research programs in the division supports a steady successful completion of doctoral theses (PhD).

Main Research Topics

Angiology

The main research topics of the Angiology Unit fall within the framework of international collaborations and are related to venous thromboembolism (FR):

  • Diagnostic strategies in deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in collaboration with the Emergency Room (Prof. O. Rutschmann).
  • Diagnostic and prognostic scores of pulmonary embolism.
  • Outpatient treatment of pulmonary embolism in collaboration with the Emergency Room (Prof. O. Rutschmann).
  • Need for anticoagulation in cases of isolated distal thrombosis or subsegmental pulmonary embolism.
  • Roles of biomarkers (NT-proBNP, troponin) in pulmonary embolism prognosis in collaboration with the Department of Genetics and Laboratory Medicine (Dr. N. Vuilleumier).
  • Role of D-dimers in the diagnosis of venous thromboembolism.
  • Diagnostic strategy for deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in pregnant women in collaboration with the Obstetrics Division (Prof. M. Boulvain) and the Radiology Division (Prof. A. Poletti).
  • Diagnostic strategy for pulmonary embolism in geriatrics.
  • Evaluation of the risk for venous thromboembolism relapse.
  • Epidemiology and prevention of venous thromboembolism in collaboration with the Department of Rehabilitation and Geriatrics (Prof. A. Perrier, Prof. J.-L. Reny).
  • Evaluation of the management of venous thromboembolic disease in a geriatric context (Swiss national cohort).
  • Pharmaceutical studies with new anticoagulant molecules.

Hemostasis

The main research topics of the Hemostasis Unit are:

  • Antiphospholipid antibodies :
    • Study of obstetric complications linked to antiphospholipid antibodies in collaboration with the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics (Dr. M. Cohen).
    • Study of the effect of antiphospholipid antibodies on the placenta in collaboration with the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics (Dr. M. Cohen).
    • Research on cell activation mechanisms by antiphospholipid antibodies, the biological effects of these antibodies and the role of Toll-like receptors in these effects.
  • Study of fibrinogen diseases and associated molecular abnormalities, in collaboration with the Department of Genetics and Development at the University of Geneva (Prof. M. Neerman-Arbez).

     

  • Research projects related to platelets (Geneva Platelet Group (FR)) :
    • Study of the determinants of platelet reactivity in cardiovascular patients through epidemiological and pharmacological approaches and the use of high-speed sequencing tools.
    • Study of the thrombogenicity of different surfaces used in vascular prostheses or dental implants (in collaboration with the Vascular Surgery Division and the Dental Medicine Section).
    • Study of platelet physiology and the role of certain surface proteins (in collaboration with the Cardiology Division (Prof. B. Kwak).
    • Study of the reversion modalities of the anti-platelet effect.

       

  • Standardization of investigations for minor hemorrhagic syndrome.

     

  • Anti-platelet antibodies and platelet genotyping project (in collaboration with the Blood Transfusion Division of the Swiss Red Cross and the HUG Special Hemostasis Laboratory).

     

  • Pharmaceutical studies with new pro- or anti-thrombotic molecules.

     

  • Participation in several registries dealing with the care of persons with hemophilia.
     
  • Studies about the mechanism for regulating the production of plasminogen activator tissue in endothelial cells.
Last update : 02/01/2019